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Posts Tagged ‘cornbread and cremasse’


Check out Cornbread and Cremasse live TONIGHT! Haitian AllStarZ Radio on WBAI 99.5 FM (or online at wbai.org) every Tuesday evening/ early Wednesday morning 12Midnight – 2:00am. Call in with your comments and shout outs at 718-780-8888.

Tune into tomorrow’s show as we welcome musical guests Monvelyno Alexis and Riva Précil also known as Bohio Music. This amazing duo delivers a wonderful blend of Haitian Vodou and Roots music. You will be thoroughly entertained with their sensual vocals and guitar.

We also welcome LIVE in the studio Ingrid Austin-Daniels of Cornbread and Cremasse with the monthly “Blague” segment and Manolia Live returns with the Haitian AllStarZ news update.

Haitian AllStarZ is hosted by Hard Hittin Harry, DJayCee, Only One Pro, and MC Dred-I. Tune in every week for a fantastic blend of Haitian Kompas, Zouk, RaRa, Kanaval, and much more! The show offers a weekly dose of Music, News, Culture, Politics and Discussion from a Haitian/American and universal perspective embracing the community we belong to.

Don’t miss HAITIAN ALL-STARZ RADIO every Tuesday evening/ early Wednesday morning 12MIDNIGHT EST on WBAI 99.5 FM!

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The battle of the Caribbean islands was on!

Flag-Pins-Haiti-Trinidad-and-Tobago

 

It all started when my in- laws coordinated a trip to their country of origin, Trinidad and Tobago.  They wanted their grandchildren to see and get to know their life journey. It was great trip with lots food, fun, and of course being with family.  It got me to thinking that it was equally important for my kids to get to know my parents’ country of origin, Haiti.

So what does a fully assimilated Haitian-American do to make that happen?

I booked a cruise, of course.

 

Now, I had set my expectations of Haiti very high. I was 6 years old the last time I had visited. I mean on a scale of 1-10, it was on one million.  What life has taught me is that the higher the expectations, the more likely you are to be disappointed.  I brought it on myself and that is exactly what happened when we docked in Labadee, Haiti. As we approached Haiti on Day 3,  I was struck by the beauty of the mountains and how picturesque the scenery was. Then out of nowhere a dark cloud appeared over us and began a torrential downpour, an ominous sign indeed.

So back to the cruise, before I get into the nitty gritty and you may feel the need to comment about how I went about it all wrong. You are right. Who asked you anyway?  The lesson in this is NEVER take a cruise line to a country if you really want to get a feel for the culture. That was my biggest mistake.
 So we arrive in Labadee Haiti, a privately owned island, sanctioned by the cruise line in a torrential downpour. I figure since we had been on that boat for 3 days, We ARE getting off.  We are greeted by a group of men singing “Guantanamera”. I did one of those gestures where you look back and then in front of you a few times, like “What in the world? Is this for real?” I understand Haitian music is a unique blend of African, Spanish, and French rhythms but I anticipated compas/kompa upon my arrival.
 We just continued on our way but that experience was just the tip of the iceberg. However, I made sure to make eye contact as if somehow they could read my mind.
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There were signs directing us to a marketplace area where we could buy from the locals. Prior to departure, it was explained that the vendors were “cruise line” approved. In other words, you had to go through a vetting process in order to work on Labadee.  As we strolled through the marketplace, I am accustomed to vendors trying to get my attention, the other guests of the cruise, weren’t so pleased. I almost wanted to yell ” Stop it, we are better than this!”.
I wanted to pick a bottle of rum, so I stepped into a small store and begin to peruse the merchandise. I don’t know who decided it would be a good idea to put a picture of Bob Marley on souvenirs with the caption ” Labadee, Haiti”.  I love Bob Marley like the next person, but I also know he is NOT Haitian.  This was not isolated either, it was everywhere.  There is so much more to Haitian culture that there is no reason to culturally misappropriate individuals.
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We have so much we could be proud of as outlined in : https://cornbreadandcremasse.wordpress.com/2016/02/07/telling-our-story-3/, but here are a just a few facts to share.
Native Haitians were pre-Columbian Ameridian named Taino/Arawak both meaning the good people.
Haiti is the most mountainous country in the Caribbean.
Haiti has the second longest coastline in the Caribbean after Cuba; 1.100 miles. Over 70% of its beaches are still virgin.
Haiti was the second country in the world to issue a Declaration of Independence, only 33 years after the United States of America.
The first and only country in the history of mankind whose independence is the result of a successful slave rebellion.
Haiti is the first Black Republic in the World.
The first country in the Western Hemisphere to abolished slavery; it would take the United States of America another 65 years to follow suit.
The first and only Black Nation to have successfully defeated a major world power in a war; under the command of Jean Jacques Dessalines, Haiti defeated the world mightiest army at the time, France’s; on November 18th 1803 after 14 years of battle.
-The only country in the Western Hemisphere to have defeated three colonial armies for its independence. The powerful armies of Spain, England and France.
-Haiti is unique in history, going directly from slavery to nationhood.
The National flag of Venezuela was created at the sea port of  Jacmel, a city in  south east Haiti.
Upon Independence, Haiti became the first country in the American Continent to constitutionally grant all Its citizen full rights regardless of gender or race.
Haiti occupied the Dominican Republic for 22 years. From 1822 to 1844, holding the entire Island of Hispaniola under Its jurisdiction. Today’s Dominican Republic was called Spanish Haiti at the time.
Haiti is one of the only two countries in the American Continent having French as an official language. The other is Canada.
Haiti is the only country in the world with Vodou as an official religion.
For much of the 17th and the 18th century, Haiti was responsible for 60% of the world’s  coffee exports.
 Even though, things were not perfect or realistic for that matter, it meant a lot to me to be able to share the experience with my family. Clearly, I need a trip to Haiti do over and when I do, you will be the first to know.
Have you ever visited a place that didn’t quite live up to your expectations? How did you reconcile your expectations with the reality? I would love to hear your comments and ideas for my do over trip:).

 

 

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When I was a child in school, Black History Month was when I first learned about African-American heroes like Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr., Rosa Parks, Harriet Tubman, Frederick Douglas and George Washington Carver.  While it was refreshing to learn of these people and their contribution to history, I also learned how very unfairly Blacks were treated in the United States before the Civil Rights era.  Even in the midst of celebrating “us”, the “Black as the underdog” thing was looming and stayed in the back of my mind.  Honestly, Black History Month was one of the few times I didn’t so much mind being “different” or more like my African-American counterparts.  As a Haitian-American child, I knew that my parents didn’t have the same history that I was learning about.  I was still “different” — but this time I felt like maybe it wasn’t so bad.

As a parent today, I hate that my children have to learn that their country didn’t (and in many cases still doesn’t) treat Black people and other people of color fairly because of the color of their skin.  Although the list of Black Heroes that my kids are learning is longer than what I remember being taught growing up, I wonder if Black people being the historical underdog looms in their young minds as well.

blackhistorymonth

Isn’t Black History Month supposed to uplift?  Without discounting what our kids are already being taught about the historical contribution of African-Americans, why aren’t they also being taught more uplifting stories about Black people? Why aren’t they learning about Egyptian Kings and Queens? Why isn’t Haitian History part of the curriculum? It’s a more recent history.  I am of the belief (and yes, I might be biased) that Haitian history is not just for Haitians — it is literally BLACK history — a story of redemption for all people of color who have ever been enslaved.  Is the story of the Haitian Revolution too militant?  Surely it’s not more militant than the story of white settlers coming to a foreign country and taking what wasn’t theirs to begin with (i.e. American history).   I suppose we shouldn’t depend on the hunter to tell the lion’s story.

Article_didyouknow

I make it my business to share that history with my children — and whoever else will listen. (When my eldest was in Kindergarten, I spoke to his class about the Haitian Revolution during Black History Month).  Haiti’s history is all too often ignored in terms of its importance and significance. What a momentous event!  The story of the Haitian Revolution is an event that has significance, not only for Black people, but for all of humanity. When the slaves revolted in mass in 1791 after a long struggle against the French army, they were able to proclaim Haiti’s independence and the end of slavery in 1804.  It was the first time that a whole people (Black people!) extended the notion of freedom to everybody. Not only that, they also demonstrated that slavery is the unnatural state, and freedom is the natural state of people.  They rightfully took back what was theirs!

We need to boost our kids’ self esteem with this story.  Obviously the schools are not going to to it, so it is our responsibility.  My children have both African-American and Haitian ancestors, and I think it’s my job, as a Haitian American parent, to make sure they know something about the history of both sides of their family.  I think even if half of their family wasn’t Haitian, this is a story worth telling — especially to our Black children.  Haitian History is BLACK history.  It is a victorious history of an oppressed people who fought for — and won — their freedom.  This should be part of the Black History curriculum.   Until the lion tells his side of the story, the tale of the hunt will always glorify the hunter (even when the hunter wants you to think it’s all about the lion for a month).

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WBAI WINTER FUND DRIVE WEEK #1! HAITIANS ROCK TEES!

Tune in to another edition of Haitian All-StarZ Radio tonight at 12 Midnight on WBAI 99.5FM or online at www.wbai.org!

The WBAI Winter Fund Drive is officially underway Feb 1st – 28th. Please help us keep this program and the station alive with your generous donation.
Call in tonight at 718-780-8888 or log on to www.give2wbai.org to pledge your kind donation and receive a Haitian Rocks apparel tee in return.

Tonight’s show will feature Ingrid Austin-Daniels with the “Cornbread and Cremasse” Blague segment where she’ll discuss the latest blog post, plus Kompas, Rara, Kanaval, Zouk and much more great music!

Tune in tonight and every Tuesday evening/ early Wednesday morning 12 MIDNIGHT – 2AM.

 

 

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This post first appeared in the Haitian Times at the following link:

http://haitiantimes.com/6-haitian-women-to-celebrate-for-womens-history-month-10666/

March is Women’s History Month. Take a look at these six Haitian-American women who are sure to earn their place in history for their work in the Haitian community and in their respective fields.

Charlene Bathelus made history in 2012 when she became the youngest Haitian American elected to public office in Elizabeth, NJ. Bathelus, who serves on the Elizabeth school board, is also an active community leader in New Jersey. Bathelus is also the community partnership coordinator for Prevention Links and supervises two local civic groups where she educates the public on the importance of civic engagement and leading a productive and healthy lifestyle.

Executive director of Haiti Cultural Exchange (HCX), Regine Roumainworks tirelessly to promote Haitian culture through her organization. Located in Brooklyn, HCX hosts events ranging from open readings from emerging and celebrated Haitian writers to art exhibitions and live musical performances. Her mission is to bring all realms of Haitian culture to the masses to celebrate it for the beauty it has to offer.

Assemblywoman Kimberly Jean-Pierre was elected in 2014 to the 11th assembly district, which includes Wheatley Heights, Lindenhurst and North Amityville. Jean-Pierre is an active member of the Haitian community. She is the former vice president of Haitian Americans United for Change (HAUC). After the 2010 earthquake, she led a relief team to provide emergency support to those affected by the quake.

Blogging and marketing maven Karen Civil has made a name for herself in the entertainment and hip-hop industry. In 2014, she put her notoriety to work for Haiti when she traveled to Haiti and made a $41,000 donation to build the Live Civil Playground.

Elected in 2013, Valerie Cartright was the first Haitian American elected to office in Suffolk County. She is serving her first term as councilwoman for the Town of Brookhaven.  An attorney by trade, she has an impressive legal career that spans 10 years.

Fabienne Colas is a modern-day Renaissance woman. The actress, director and producer founded the Montreal International Black Film Festival, Canada’s largest black film festival. “Considered by many as the most popular actress in Haitian cinema, Fabienne started out as a model, was crowned Miss Haiti in 2000 and has represented Haiti in numerous beauty contests around the world.”

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This essay by Wynnie Lamour was first published in Haitian Times magazine. ht-haitiantimes_logotype-tm-02-01

Haitian Creole bridges the divide between generations of women in the diaspora

 

The night before my grandmother died, she came to visit me. It had already been a long journey. For my mother, the only child my grandmother had, to watch as her poto mitanbecame a frail and weak version of her previous self. For my brothers, full of emotion but unable to adequately express themselves. For me, her first grandchild, on the verge of womanhood and about to lose one of the most powerful women in her life. For everyone, it was essentially a journey of pain.

I could sense her presence but I wasn’t afraid. This was the woman who had sacrificed so deeply for my mother. This was the woman who had served as mother not just to my own but to countless others. This was the woman who, just the day before, had defied doctors’ orders, dressed herself in her Sunday best and walked on her own two feet to church. This was the woman who knew exactly which teas and herbs were best for every malady known — at least to me.

In the words of Mirlande Jean-Gilles, she was “…a magical woman…” — the epitome of a Haitian woman. Her silence spoke volumes as she watched me. Her love and gratitude for all that we had done for her poured over me. I wept knowing that her physical self was on its way beyond our reality. I weep now, knowing that I’ll never again hear her sing as she cooks mayi djon djon (cornmeal with mushroom root) and asks me if I want some zaboka(avocado) with it.

But my grandmother, like her ancestors before her, is very much a part of my present.

The magical women of our past blazed trails, and not just in the figurative way in which so many change-makers are engaged today. Instead, they laid down their lives, set aside their dreams, and got on their knees to implore the spirits for the courage to continue doing what they must for their families and their communities.

It wasn’t until years after her passing did it occur to me that she was the catalyst for my “return” to Haiti through language. Her journey with death and beyond shook something loose inside me: a desire to reanimate that which already resided in me.

For those of us who grew up in the diaspora, the enormity of what our mothers did has not been completely lost on us. To leave behind everything and everyone that you know and move to a country that is less than welcoming to a people that the world over constantly views as hopeless, is the epitome of sacrifice. How then can we bridge the divide that often exists between us and our mothers? How can we cut through the veil of misunderstanding that can sometimes lie between a mother whose being lives in one culture while her daughter toes the line between two cultures?

There is no better way to accomplish this than through language. Language is the mirror through which we can truly see the world through the eyes of another. Language is the scaffolding that supports our relationships and provides a structure that we all crave in our interactions with each other.

For Haitians worldwide, Kreyòl serves this purpose and so much more. It is the language that lives in us all; and to speak Kreyòl is to communicate in a language that elicits a deep and emotional response in its people.

Many young hyphenated Haitian women of the diaspora come to the Haitian Creole Language Institute via this pathway: wanting to reconnect with their Haitian mothers in their native tongue; wanting to understand more fully the meaning behind their words; and wanting to engage with their mothers in a more intimate way.

HCLI affords them the opportunity to learn not just the various nuances of the language but also the history and the profundity of what it means to speak Kreyòl. It goes beyond speaking the language of revolutionaries. It is to speak the language of not just the magical women of our past but also the magical women of our present — who continue to strive to do the best they can with the tools that they have in the hopes that our futures can be just a little bit more magical.

It has been through Kreyòl that I pay continuous homage to my grandmother, and her mother before her, and all the mothers of my past. Their spirits embody me every time I open my mouth and fix my lips to speak the same sounds that propelled their lives. It is our hope here at HCLI that we can provide others that same opportunity — to become one with what is, as Haitians, the very fabric of our being.

Wynnie Lamour is the founder of the Haitian Creole Language Institute.

For more information on the Elementary Haitian Creole course that takes place on Tuesdays from 7:00 – 8:30 pm in Brooklyn, visit haitiancreoleinstitute.com.

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This essay by Wynnie Lamour was first published in Haitian Times magazine. ht-haitiantimes_logotype-tm-02-01

Haitian Creole bridges the divide between generations of women in the diaspora

Courtesy of Wynnie Lamour

Courtesy of Wynnie Lamour

The night before my grandmother died, she came to visit me. It had already been a long journey. For my mother, the only child my grandmother had, to watch as her poto mitanbecame a frail and weak version of her previous self. For my brothers, full of emotion but unable to adequately express themselves. For me, her first grandchild, on the verge of womanhood and about to lose one of the most powerful women in her life. For everyone, it was essentially a journey of pain.

I could sense her presence but I wasn’t afraid. This was the woman who had sacrificed so deeply for my mother. This was the woman who had served as mother not just to my own but to countless others. This was the woman who, just the day before, had defied doctors’ orders, dressed herself in her Sunday best and walked on her own two feet to church. This was the woman who knew exactly which teas and herbs were best for every malady known — at least to me.

In the words of Mirlande Jean-Gilles, she was “…a magical woman…” — the epitome of a Haitian woman. Her silence spoke volumes as she watched me. Her love and gratitude for all that we had done for her poured over me. I wept knowing that her physical self was on its way beyond our reality. I weep now, knowing that I’ll never again hear her sing as she cooks mayi djon djon (cornmeal with mushroom root) and asks me if I want some zaboka(avocado) with it.

But my grandmother, like her ancestors before her, is very much a part of my present.

Courtesy of Wynnie Lamour

Courtesy of Wynnie Lamour

The magical women of our past blazed trails, and not just in the figurative way in which so many change-makers are engaged today. Instead, they laid down their lives, set aside their dreams, and got on their knees to implore the spirits for the courage to continue doing what they must for their families and their communities.

It wasn’t until years after her passing did it occur to me that she was the catalyst for my “return” to Haiti through language. Her journey with death and beyond shook something loose inside me: a desire to reanimate that which already resided in me.

For those of us who grew up in the diaspora, the enormity of what our mothers did has not been completely lost on us. To leave behind everything and everyone that you know and move to a country that is less than welcoming to a people that the world over constantly views as hopeless, is the epitome of sacrifice. How then can we bridge the divide that often exists between us and our mothers? How can we cut through the veil of misunderstanding that can sometimes lie between a mother whose being lives in one culture while her daughter toes the line between two cultures?

There is no better way to accomplish this than through language. Language is the mirror through which we can truly see the world through the eyes of another. Language is the scaffolding that supports our relationships and provides a structure that we all crave in our interactions with each other.

For Haitians worldwide, Kreyòl serves this purpose and so much more. It is the language that lives in us all; and to speak Kreyòl is to communicate in a language that elicits a deep and emotional response in its people.

Many young hyphenated Haitian women of the diaspora come to the Haitian Creole Language Institute via this pathway: wanting to reconnect with their Haitian mothers in their native tongue; wanting to understand more fully the meaning behind their words; and wanting to engage with their mothers in a more intimate way.

HCLI affords them the opportunity to learn not just the various nuances of the language but also the history and the profundity of what it means to speak Kreyòl. It goes beyond speaking the language of revolutionaries. It is to speak the language of not just the magical women of our past but also the magical women of our present — who continue to strive to do the best they can with the tools that they have in the hopes that our futures can be just a little bit more magical.

It has been through Kreyòl that I pay continuous homage to my grandmother, and her mother before her, and all the mothers of my past. Their spirits embody me every time I open my mouth and fix my lips to speak the same sounds that propelled their lives. It is our hope here at HCLI that we can provide others that same opportunity — to become one with what is, as Haitians, the very fabric of our being.

Wynnie Lamour is the founder of the Haitian Creole Language Institute.

For more information on the Elementary Haitian Creole course that takes place on Tuesdays from 7:00 – 8:30 pm in Brooklyn, visit haitiancreoleinstitute.com.

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